Tag Archives: tables

Tables and figures

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Cocoa On The Picnic Table by Robin Horn, Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs License

This webpage from Bates College is entitled “Almost Everything You Wanted to Know About Making Tables and Figures.”

It’s a very appropriate title because the page has information about captions, referring to tables and figures in the text, where to place them in your text, and formatting them so they are clear and easy to read. It has lots of helpful examples.
http://abacus.bates.edu/~ganderso/biology/resources/writing/HTWtablefigs.html

For other posts that talk about tables and figures see here and here.

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Formatting tables that break over pages

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05 – August – 2011 — The Evil Gaze of Goat by reway2007 Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License

When you need to have a table running over more than one page, there are a couple of simple tricks that will help your reader. One is to make sure that the headers of the table are repeated at the top of each new page and the other is to make sure that each row is not broken across two pages. You can fiddle about and do these manually, but did you know that Word can do both of these operations automatically for you? Simple. See these two posts for how.

Repeating table header rows
https://seehowtodo.wordpress.com/2015/02/23/repeating-headers-when-a-table-breaks-over-a-page/

Stopping tables breaking within rows
https://seehowtodo.wordpress.com/2015/02/23/stopping-table-rows-from-breaking-across-pages/

Using tables and graphs to present data

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Tables with view by Theophilos Papadopoulos, Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs License

When you are discussing numbers, graphs and tables are a great tool. Both can be ways to give readers a sense of the numbers and the relationships quickly. Complicated data can become simple to interpret when it is well organised in tables and graphs. So how do you make sure your graphs and tables are well organised? You need to balance having enough information in them so they are completely and easily interpretable with keeping them as simple and uncluttered as possible. It will take some creativity to get this balance right.

This article from the Vanderbilt University Assessment Website has some key points and good examples to follow.
http://virg.vanderbilt.edu/AssessmentPlans/Results/Reporting_Results_Quantitative.aspx