Tag Archives: in-text citations

What to do when Endnote adds initials to citations

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The name is 5995, Cow 5995, by Wesley de Ridder, Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs License

When you are citing literature in Endnote using an author-date system, you will sometimes find that Endnote adds author initials to your citations. So instead of
      (Smith and Weston, 2004),
it says
      (R. A. Smith and Weston, 2004).
This is so annoying! But its really easy to fix once you realise why Endnote has done it.

Endnote does this when you have two authors with the same surname, so that readers can tell which Smith you re talking about. For example, if somewhere else in your document you have cited L. L. Smith and Jones, 1999, then adding the initials to both is necessary. Unfortunately in those cases you just have to live with it.

But what about when its the same Smith, but Endnote still adds the initials?  You will often find you are citing more than one of the same author’s papers so it can be a common problem. The issue is that Endnote doesn’t know its the same Smith, because you have slightly different entries for the author’s names.

So, for example, if one reference is listed as authored by
       Ronald A. Smith
and another is listed as authored by
 –      R. A. Smith
then Endnote thinks these are different people.

To fix this what you need to do is look at your references in Endnote and make the authors all the same. (Well only if they really are the same people!) And I mean exactly the same. Full stops make a difference to Endnote. I also found that spaces do to and these can be tricky if there is a space at the end of the name as you can’t see it.

I usually don’t worry if names are slightly different as I enter them in Endnote. I wait until I see a problem in the document I am writing, because I have far more references in Endnote than I would ever use in one document.

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Formatting in-text citations in Endnote

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When you are writing it is sometimes useful to refer to the authors of a paper in the sentence, rather than just including the citation at the end of the sentence. This means you can use more active language rather than the passive voice, and it can make your writing clearer and more concise.

For example you may want to say that
“Smith (2001) found that 6 of 8 dogs treated with…..”

When you insert the reference though with Endnote it will first appear as
“(Smith, 2001) found that 6 of 8 dogs treated with…..”
which is not correctly formatted.

To change the formatting of the citation, select it by clicking on it and then go to Edit and Manage Citation(s) on the Endnote ribbon.

Under Formatting choose Display as: Author (Year) from the drop down menu and then select OK.

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Your reference will now be correctly formatted.